“Autumn carries more gold in its pocket than all the other seasons.” ― Jim Bishop

While Spring brings the promise of a new season and Summer the transition from green to gold, it is Autumn that possesses the greatest treasure for the seeker of trout. For Autumn’s pockets overflow and the temporal treasure of gold spills onto the watery canvas, providing moments of transcendence. This is Autumn’s moment; the trout, the angler, and the trees recognize that nothing gold can stay.

Silver Creek
The Creek is magnificent in October. There can be good numbers of Fall Baetis and October Caddis as well as the occasional Mahogany Dun hatching during the most pleasant time of day. For the Baetis, have a good selection of duns, cripples, and spinners tied by the House of Harrop in size 20-24. A large Elk Hair or Goddard Caddis floating high and dry works for the October Caddis. If you see Mahoganies fluttering about, you should have a few dun, emerger, and spinner patterns to try. If the aforementioned bugs are not present, terrestrials may still take fish, especially on windy days. Also, nymphing dry dropper style with size 20-16 dark nymphs is effective. As always, be aware of browns on redds and leave them alone.

The Big Wood
For dry fly aficionados, the Wood has been spectacular. The weather has been topsy-turvy which has forced the fish to transition into winter holding water. As a result, when the Baetis hatch is on, anglers can find good numbers of rising fish in slow water but the fish have abandoned the fast riffles. This should continue over the next two weeks and into November. The one challenge anglers will need to contend with is the influx of freshly fallen leaves. This is the time of year when the fall’s golden foliage starts to come down. No worries… the fish have an uncanny ability to see the bugs through the leaves. Prior to and after the hatch, nymphing with either a dry dropper rig or Euro Style can also be productive.

Big Wood Tributaries
For small stream lovers, try Trail Creek, Warm Springs, the East, or North Fork of the Wood. These creeks are the perfect diversion for a few hours of fun. The same patterns you would use on the Wood or the Lost will work fine hear. Keep it simple and be stealthy.

Salmon River
The morning temps are frigid this time of year. Take your time if you decide to fish around the Stanley area. The water is low and there are plenty of pull-offs where you can find a riffle and bucket to work over with a streamer, a double nymph rig, or Euro Style. No matter what technique you prefer, you are sure to find an array of whitefish along with some decent cutthroat, rainbow, and maybe even a Bull trout.

South Fork of the Boise
The South Fork will continue to fish well right through October. And the flows are perfect for wade fishing at around 300 CFS. While the dry fly window is getting shorter, you can still expect to see plenty of Midge, Baetis, Caddis, and Crane Flies most of the afternoon hours. Nymphing will always produce good numbers of trout and whitefish.

Upper Lost Drainage
There is fine fall fishing to be had in the late afternoon in the upper reaches of the Lost. Seek out good holding water anywhere along the main stem down from the North Fork confluence. For flies try Red Quills, caddis, and terrestrials. If the surface activity is slow, tie a dropper of the back of your dry and work the water over again. For the deep buckets, try a double nymph rig.

The Lost Below Mackay
This is a wonderful fall fishery. Flows are steady at 200 CFS right now, perfect for wading with ease. Expect Baetis to be the main source of food right now. Be sure to have a range of Baetis patterns from size 20 to 24. Trouthunter 6 or 6.5X tippet on a 9 to 12 foot leader is a must. Nymphing is by far the most productive. Try fishing a dry dropper rig or Euro Nymphing with small tactical style nymphs (18-22) or Zebra Midge in olive, black, or red.

Local Ponds
All the ponds were stocked in late August for the last time, but there are plenty of fish to play with. Drop on by before you take your family fishing and we will make sure you have the right gear to be successful.

South Fork of the Boise: Pink Alberts | Hoppers | Chubby Chernobyl | Iron Lotus | SRS Bullet French Nymph | Duracell Jig 12-18 | Jake’s Perdigon 14-18 | Tungsten Nemec Stone | Pat’s Rubber Legs | Stone Daddy 8 | Bishop’s Dynamite | DB Zebra Midge in black, red, or olive | King Prince

Silver Creek: October Callibaetis | Baetis | Mahogany Duns | Griffiths Gnats | Parachute Midge | Iron Lotus | SRS Bullet French Nymph | Jake’s Perdigon 14-18 | DB Zebra Midge in black, red, or olive

Big Lost, Big Wood and Tributaries: Beatis | Purple Haze | Elk Hair Caddis | Golden Stone | Pats Rubber Legs | Buggers | Chubby Chernobyl’s | Bishop’s Dynamite | SRS Bullet French Nymph | Jake’s Perdigon | Rainbow Warrior | King Prince Nymph | Zebra Midge | Quildigons | Frenchie

 

Silver Creek
Big Wood
The Big Lost
South Fork of the Boise
Salmon River
114 cfs
241 cfs
214 cfs
304 cfs
1320 cfs