Certified Fly Casting Instructor

Hooked at Six Years Old

“I was hooked and my dad bought me a fly rod and reel for my sixth birthday and a fly tying vice for my seventh birthday,”

because large fish actively leap out of the water

to take bugs out of the air. Woo hoo!

Carl Evenson hails from Boulder, Colorado and earned a degree in Fisheries/Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana at Missoula. He came to Idaho to guide wilderness survival courses and fell in love with the landscape, which is easy to do. Some of his earliest fishing memories are with his grandparents going after sunfish with a cane pole when was three or four years old. “I was hooked and my dad bought me a fly rod and reel for my sixth birthday and a fly tying vice for my seventh birthday,” Carl said. His best guide trip was with a guest who had just had lung transplants after a battle with lung cancer. His prognosis wasn’t great but Carl said, “he was so full of life and willing to live in the present. After a couple great days fishing in the winter on the Big Wood River, he wanted to try steelheading on the salmon. Climbing even a six-foot bank to the car was a major physical feat for him, but we went for it and he landed several steelhead with the last large hen swimming between his legs and hog tying him!

He and I spent many more years fishing together. He passed away several years ago and I continue to fish in his honor.” When he is not fishing, Carl is passionate about backpacking, backcountry/Telemark skiing, mushroom hunting, gardening, home brewing, and traveling. He is also interested in solar energy and architecture.

Guiding Style

Combination. “It really depends on the focus of the day, the fishery, and the guests. Sometimes I become very focused on catching fish if I sense that’s what a guest is most interested in. However, by nature, I’m an outdoor educator, so I enjoy teaching and I have an inherent tendency to teach about the natural world surrounding us.”

Fun Facts about Carl

  • Both of his parents were Fulbright scholars and scientists. His father was a physicist and measured the speed of light and his mother published books on mycology.
  • His father paid for his college education by tying flies.
  • As a child, Carl lived in Brazil in a small town and went to school with the Portuguese-speaking locals. “My Brazilian friends were some of the healthiest and happiest families I have known, despite being some of the poorest,” Carl said.
  • The perfect end to a day on the river for Carl is “standing at peace by the river and listening to the birds and the sounds of the water as the shadows lengthen and the sun fades away.”
  • His favorite hatch is the parachute crane on the Big Lost River because large fish actively leap out of the water to take bugs out of the air. Woo hoo!
What folks say about fishing with Carl

Went to the Lost above Mackey. It was a welcome contrast to the RR which has been very frustrating. Carl did a great job, had tied some awesome flies and we caught consistently through the day. And he was great company. Thanks for setting me up with him, Terry.

Richard Barker

Carl was everything we hoped to find in a guide. He put us in great positions to find success and was a wonderfully patient teacher. I learned some new skills that will make me a better fisherman. We really enjoyed our time spent visiting with him on the long drive to and from the Big Lost. Most of all, we caught more trout than we ever dreamed possible. I will highly recommend Carl and hope I'm fortunate enough to fish with him again someday.

Chris Teague

Carl was an excellent guide, and we caught unaccountably many fish.

Anonymous

I've had two guides now-- Cal and Carl Evenson- both are top notch!

Anonymous

They're saying a lot of great things. He's just too humble to share them. Meet the man, you'll have something meaningful to say too.

Anonymous

Carl is a first-rate guide who always teaches me something.

Anonomyous

Outstanding! Carl knows his business and it was a pleasure to spend the day with him. Would highly recommend

Mark Scheving